Pope Francis Condemns ISIS

Demonstrators from various religions gather during protest in Iraq against militants of Islamic State. (CNS photo/Azad Lashkari, Reuters)

“Thousands of people, including many Christians, driven from their homes in a brutal manner; children dying of thirst and hunger in their flight; women kidnapped; people massacred; violence of every kind”—Pope Francis was clear in his condemnation of the actions of the militants of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria in his remarks on Aug. 10: “All this greatly offends God and humanity. Hatred is not to be carried in the name of God. War is not to be waged in the name of God.” In a letter to U.N. General Secretary Ban Ki-moon on Aug. 9, Pope Francis appealed to the international community “to take action to end the humanitarian tragedy now underway.” He added, “The violent attacks that are sweeping across Northern Iraq cannot but awaken the consciences of all men and women of goodwill to concrete acts of solidarity by protecting those affected or threatened by violence and assuring the necessary and urgent assistance for the many displaced people as well as their safe return to their cities and their homes.”

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