Brazilian bishop resigns after priests accused of pedophilia

Pope Francis accepted the resignation of Archbishop Aldo di Cillo Pagotto of Brazil on July 6. The resignation comes after accusations of pedophilia lodged at some of the priests taken in by Archbishop Pagotto. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Catholics in the northeastern Brazilian state of Paraiba woke on July 6 to find that Archbishop Aldo di Cillo Pagotto was stepping down after having his resignation accepted by Pope Francis.

The Vatican said the pope accepted his resignation in accordance with Canon 401.2 of the Code of Canon Law, which covers "ill health or some other grave cause."

Advertisement

In a letter about his resignation, the archbishop said he always tried to give the best of himself and admitted he made mistakes.

"I gave shelter to priests and seminarians, in order to offer them new chances in life. Among those were some who were later suspected of committing serious derelictions. I made the mistake of being too trusting," stated the letter.

Some of the priests taken in by Archbishop Pagotto have been accused of pedophilia. In June, Pope Francis warned that bishops guilty of looking the other way or covering up child abuse by priests within their congregations could be removed from their duties.

In his letter, Archbishop Pagotto, who headed the Archdiocese of Paraiba for the past 12 years, said he took tough and urgent measures regarding the reorganization of the administration and recovery of the archdiocese's assets, displeasing many people along the way. And for those actions, he said, there was retaliation.

He said that in addition to internal and external retaliation, there was an effort to destabilize the archdiocese by pressure groups, including those labeled "anonymous priests" who received wide media coverage.

With the pressure, the archbishop said, his power of coordination was lost, and the church became divided. He said he thought it was best "for the church as a whole and in particular for the church of Paraiba" to offer his resignation.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

The news from Ireland and the United States reminds us of Herod, of Pharaoh. What culture betrays its children?
The EditorsMay 26, 2018
A woman religious casts her ballot May 25 in Dublin as Ireland holds a referendum on its law on abortion. Voters went to the polls May 25 to decide whether to liberalize the country's abortion laws. (CNS photo/Alex Fraser, Reuters)
The repeal of Ireland's Eighth Amendment, which guarantees the right to life of the unborn, has passed with a nearly 2-1 margin.
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce, Tuesday, May 22, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The Secretary of Education stirred up controversy when she said it was up to schools to decide if an undocumented student should be reported to authorities.
J.D. Long-GarcíaMay 25, 2018
Thousands gathered in Dublin May 12 to say "Love Both" and "Vote No" to abortion on demand. They were protesting abortion on demand in the forthcoming referendum May 25. (CNS photo/John McElroy)
“Priests and bishops get verbal abuse by being told, ‘How can you speak for women? You don’t know what it’s like!’”
America StaffMay 25, 2018