News Briefs

The U.S. Senate on June 16 approved a measure supported by Catholic and evangelical leaders that would prohibit the use of torture by any U.S. government agency as an interrogation technique. • The Philippine government on June 16 started the Catholic Church-backed process of decommissioning members of the country’s largest Muslim rebel group, a process bringing the Moro Islamic Liberation Front a step closer to its goal of self-determination after more than four decades of fighting. • In a 5-to-4 ruling announced on June 18, the U.S. Supreme Court said Kevan Brumfield, convicted in Baton Rouge, La., of the murder of a police officer, was entitled to have a claim heard that his low IQ and other evidence of mental disability should exempt him from the death penalty. • Jozef Wesolowski, the laicized former Vatican nuncio to the Dominican Republic, will stand trial on July 11 in a Vatican court on charges of the sexual abuse of minors and possession of child pornography. • A charity for youth established by Pope Francis suspended a donations agreement with a South American soccer federation on June 11, following the corruption scandal that erupted last month with the worldwide soccer federation, FIFA.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

The Adorers of the Blood of Christ have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether their religious freedom rights were violated by the construction and pending use of a natural gas pipeline through its land.
Throughout the discussions leading up to the synod's final week, small groups "have been very specific and intentional that we don't become too Western with our approach."
In a statement issued a few minutes after the broadcast of a story from Radio-Canada investigating sexual abuse allegedly committed by 10 Oblate missionaries in First Nation communities, the Quebec Assembly of Catholic Bishops told of their "indignation and shame" for the "terrible tragedy of
Central American migrants depart from Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Oct. 21. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
Many of the migrants in the caravan are fleeing Central America’s “Northern Triangle”—El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. These countries are beset by “the world’s highest murder rates, deaths linked to drug trafficking and organized crime and endemic poverty.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 23, 2018