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Three months into his papacy the total number of followers of the pope’s nine Twitter accounts was more than 6.9 million. • For the first time the Davenport, Iowa-based Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award is being taken overseas, to France, where it will be presented on July 7 to Jean Vanier, founder of L’Arche. • Catholic Relief Services on June 19 named the recipients of its first Egan Journalism Fellowship: Lisa Hendey of CatholicMom.com; Kerry Weber, associate editor of America; Michelle Bauman of Catholic News Agency/EWTN; and Ron Lajoie of Catholic New York. • Archbishop Michel Cartateguy of Niamey, Niger, said on June 9 that attacks by Islamist rebels across Africa’s Sahel region are leaving Christian communities “living in anxiety and fear.” • Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore said the statesman Sargent Shriver “was a living example of how faith enriches public life” on June 21 at standing-room only Mass opening the second Fortnight for Freedom. • Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez marked World Refugee Day on June 20 by asking for U.S. support and resettlement of vulnerable refugee populations across the world, especially those fleeing the civil war in Syria.

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