Gang Truce Sought In Honduras

Msgr. Romulo Emiliani Sánchez, C.M.F., auxiliary bishop of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, has begun a dialogue with the main criminal gangs in his Central American nation in an attempt at a truce modeled after an agreement that has reduced gang violence in the neigboring country of El Salvador. “We are in a process of recovering respect for life; we are listening to both gangs, but the government has not yet given an answer,” said Bishop Sánchez. The two gangs are the Mara Salvatrucha and the “18 Street” gang. The bishop has acknowledged that the government is reluctant to talk to the gangs, but “we have the example of countries such as El Salvador, Guatemala and Colombia,” where authorities have negotiated with gang members to promote peace. Bishop Sánchez said the progress of the peace efforts may be measured in “generations’ time.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
John Donaghy
5 years ago
The auxiliary bishop of San Pedro Sula should be noted as Monseñor/Bishop Emiliani. As is common in Latin America he has two last names Emiliani Sánchez, the first of which is his father's name and the second his mother's. So it is inaccurate to call him Bishop Sánchez. Bishop Emiliani is a remarkable bishop in his ministry to "those deprived of liberty," as we call the imprisoned here. A short time ago he negotiated the end of a riot that had killed several people, going into the prison several times. As i heard him say, he wasn't sure he would come out alive. I pray his courage and his faith in God will help bring about a peace between the gangs and violence free zones as has happened in El Salvador.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

The news from Ireland and the United States reminds us of Herod, of Pharaoh. What culture betrays its children?
The EditorsMay 26, 2018
A woman religious casts her ballot May 25 in Dublin as Ireland holds a referendum on its law on abortion. Voters went to the polls May 25 to decide whether to liberalize the country's abortion laws. (CNS photo/Alex Fraser, Reuters)
The repeal of Ireland's Eighth Amendment, which guarantees the right to life of the unborn, has passed with a nearly 2-1 margin.
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce, Tuesday, May 22, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The Secretary of Education stirred up controversy when she said it was up to schools to decide if an undocumented student should be reported to authorities.
J.D. Long-GarcíaMay 25, 2018
Thousands gathered in Dublin May 12 to say "Love Both" and "Vote No" to abortion on demand. They were protesting abortion on demand in the forthcoming referendum May 25. (CNS photo/John McElroy)
“Priests and bishops get verbal abuse by being told, ‘How can you speak for women? You don’t know what it’s like!’”
America StaffMay 25, 2018