Cupich: Pro-lifers Want Everybody to Have 'Place at the Table'

Chicago's new archbishop told the crowd gathered for the March for Life Chicago Jan. 18 that the pro-life movement wants "to make sure that everybody has a place at the table."

"It's not about criticizing or judging or condemning, it's about accompanying one another because that's what life is all about -- living in community," Archbishop Blase J. Cupich said.

Advertisement

"We are here as an invitation so that others come and join us," he added.

More than 3,500 people participated in the event, held in advance of the national March for Life planned for Jan. 22 in Washington, marking the anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion virtually on demand.

In Chicago, the march began with a rally in Federal Plaza, followed by participants walking through the Loop -- the city's central business district -- to the James R. Thompson Center for a closing rally.

In his remarks at the first rally, Archbishop Cupich said: "We're here because to march means we can't sit still. We can't sit still and let another day go by without bringing to the attention of everyone that there are those who are struggling -- literally struggling -- to come into the world."

"We are here to do everything possible to make sure that their right to life is preserved," he said.

Participants came from throughout Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana.

In promoting this year's event, organizers said in a statement that one aim was to "to show that one of the most pro-abortion cities in the country can lead one of the most successful, fun and loving marches to defend pre-born children and their mothers."

"Remember Illinois' politicians are watching us. We need your help to show them how strong the Illinois pro-life movement is," it said.

 
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

A woman who told police that she and her family were from Sudan is taken into custody by a Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer after arriving in February 2017 by taxi and walking across the U.S.-Canada border into Quebec. (CNS photo/Christinne Muschi, Reuters)
Canada is not innocent when it comes to immigration policies that have the potential to hurt individuals and divide families.
Dean DettloffJuly 13, 2018
In this June 6, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Chief of Staff John Kelly attends a briefing on this year's hurricane season at the Federal Emergency Management Agency Headquarters in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
The private letter, sent more than a year ago, may have had changed Mr. Kelly’s mind for a time.
J.D. Long-GarcíaJuly 13, 2018
May the best team win. Actually, may Croatia win, argues Travis Timmons.
Travis Timmons July 13, 2018
A banner showing St. John Paul II hangs from a lamp pole in Krakow, Poland, as Pope Francis arrives to attend World Youth Day in 2016. Surveys show that Poland leads Europe, and the United States, in religious commitment. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
U.S. religious belief has been more resilient than in other modernized, affluent countries. Still, weekly churchgoing pales compared with Poland.
Stephen BullivantJuly 13, 2018