Going Non-Nuclear

Nuclear disarmament is a moral imperative that requires bold action from the world’s military powers, a U.S. cardinal and a former secretary of defense said at a forum on Oct. 25 sponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Cardinal Roger Mahony, retired archbishop of Los Angeles, and William Perry, who served as defense secretary under President Bill Clinton and helped build the U.S. nuclear arsenal during the cold war, said that even though eliminating nuclear weapons around the world will be a tough challenge, this does not mean world leaders should not try. “The church...finds the nuclear status quo morally unacceptable,” Cardinal Mahony said, pointing to the need to begin moving toward a mutual, verifiable, global ban on such weapons. The church rejects “the view that nuclear deterrence is the only option in the long term,” he said. “Rather, the church insists that nuclear disarmament, not nuclear deterrence, is a long-term basis for security.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018
Kevin Clarke tells us about his reporting from Iraq.
Olga SeguraOctober 19, 2018