U.K. Quakers Boycott Israeli Settler Exports

Quakers in Britain have agreed to boycott products from Israeli settlements in the West Bank. The Quakers consider the boycott a nonviolent move for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. Half a million Israeli settlers live illegally in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem. The settlements on Palestinian land are protected by the Israeli government and military, and they prevent or restrict access by Palestinians to their land, water supplies, education, health services and more. Extensive settlement infrastructure divides up Palestinian land, creating obstacles to peace. Palestinian Quakers are calling for Quakers around the world to consider boycott, divestment and sanctions because of the worsening situation caused by Israel’s occupation. “People matter more than territory,” said a statement from the Quakers. “We pray fervently for both Israelis and Palestinians…. We hope they will find an end to their fears and the beginning of their mutual co-existence based on a just peace.”

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