Bankrupt Diocese Raises $22 million

Boosting morale in a diocese deeply wounded because of the abuse of children by some members of the clergy in past decades, Catholics in the Davenport Diocese pledged $22 million in a capital campaign that succeeded despite the worst economic conditions in decades. The campaign was the first in over 20 years for the diocese and came at a time of rebuilding after bankruptcy. “I am absolutely overwhelmed at the response of people for their church,” Davenport’s Bishop Martin J. Amos, right, said. “The initial need was prompted by the bankruptcy, but the success of the campaign has truly moved us forward in faith and hope.” Bishop Amos said volunteers “were absolutely super in listening to fellow parishioners. I think that was a real benefit to the campaign.... People were able to vent about things within the church that troubled them, but at the same time were able to talk about the deep faith that they have and what the church has meant to them in a very positive way.”

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