Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
Voices
Kathleen Bonnette, Th.D., is an adjunct professor of theology at Georgetown University, the 2022 Imbesi Family St. Augustine Fellow at Villanova University’s Augustinian Institute and a home-schooling mother of three children.
Demonstrators gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on July 9, 2018. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
Too often the pro-life movement has been tempted into the pursuit of political power and domination over pro-choice opponents. But women worried about their rights are not the enemy.
(iStock/Estradaanton)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
Pregnancy transforms a woman’s body into one that supports another but nevertheless remains hers. This is too often overlooked in pro-life political arguments.
LaQuita Howard of Washington, with the League of Women Voters, attends a rally for voting rights, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2021, near the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
The common good requires that every person can contribute their voice meaningfully to the effort of building a just society. That is why Catholics should march for the equal right to vote.
Pope Francis delivers a recorded message during a news conference to unveil a new platform for action based on his 2015 encyclical “Laudato Si'” at the Vatican on May 25. At the dais are Carolina Bianchi, who works with the Global Catholic Climate Movement, and Sister Sheila Kinsey, co-secretary of the Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Commission of the International Union of Superiors General. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
FaithShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
For many women religious, the Laudato Si’ Action Platform is an opportunity to be creative, writes Kathleen Bonnette, as well as a way to disprove the alarmist idea that their communities are fading into obscurity.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
It is easy to mock “wokeness,” writes Kathleen Bonnette, but developing an awareness of the realities that others face is relevant to the first step of the pastoral cycle: seeing.
A Customs and Border Protection agent monitors detainees at a Border Patrol station in McAllen, Texas, on July 12, 2019. (CNS photo/Veronica G. Cardenas, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
If “canceling” is a means of banishing to the shadows something that causes discomfort that is precisely what we are doing to migrants at our border.
Gary Ragland, 64, votes for the first time during early voting in Atlanta on Oct. 28, 2020. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
Georgia’s new voting law should set off social-justice alarm bells, writes Kathleen Bonnette. We should listen to the communities most affected by the new restrictions.
In the wake of the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, how can we achieve national unity and justice without being vengeful or dominative? (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
President Biden called for national unity in his inaugural address, but vengeance is not the way to repair public trust, writes Kathleen Bonnette. Restorative justice is a better way toward flourishing for all.
The microplastics discovered in human placentas were much smaller, invisible to the naked eye, but they are part of a rapidly worsening pollution crisis. (iStock/pcess609)
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
Tiny pieces of plastic waste, already found at the top of Mount Everest and the bottom of the ocean, may now have a toehold in the human womb, writes Kathleen Bonnette.
Politics & SocietyShort Take
Kathleen Bonnette
When neither political party fully affirms the principles of our faith, writes Kathleen Bonnette, we must look at the world around us to decide which principles are most at stake.