News Briefs

Nations serve their own interests as well as the good of migrants when they adopt family-friendly immigration policies, said a statement issued on May 14 by the Pontifical Council for Migrants and Travelers. • Jesuit-run Marquette University, in Milwaukee, on May 6 rescinded a job offer to a Seattle professor who is openly gay, a decision that has been criticized by some Marquette faculty members and students. • Projects aimed at rebuilding church infrastructure damaged by the recent earthquakes in Haiti and Chile will receive nearly $1 million from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. • U.N. human rights experts urge the State of Arizona and the U.S. government “to take all measures necessary to ensure that the immigration law is in line with international human rights standards.” • Promising to dispel age-old biases and shed some light on how the Roman Inquisition really worked, the Vatican has released hundreds of documents describing in detail the Inquisition’s investigations. • The Diocese of Burlington, Vt., announced on May 13 that it had settled 26 lawsuits involving sexual abuse by clerics for nearly $18 million and will sell diocesan property to cover the cost.

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Protestors rally to support Temporary Protected Status near the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Sept. 26. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
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