Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
April 05, 2010

A new analysis of religious identification finds that contrary to popular and scholarly belief, U.S. Latinos are not leaving the Catholic Church for Protestant churches but are becoming more secularized, affiliating with no faith at all. A study released March 16 by the Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., reported that Latinos who have left the church since 1990 have shifted toward secularism as they become more Americanized. The study noted that as in the general U.S. population, Latinos became less identified with Christianity between 1990 and 2008, down from 91 percent to 82 percent. Those who said they identified with no faith grew to 12 percent in 2008 from 6 percent in 1990. The American Religious Identification Survey of 2008 reports that Latino immigrants continue to be the largest factor in maintaining the size of the U.S. Catholic population. Latinos comprised 32 percent of all U.S. Catholics in 2008 compared with 20 percent in 1990. Among Latinos, 60 percent in 2008 said they were Catholic, compared with 66 percent in 1990.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

The latest from america

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses parliament in Cape Town, South Africa, on June 9, 2022. Ramaphosa could face criminal charges and is already facing calls to step down over claims that he tried to cover up the theft of millions of dollars in U.S. currency that was hidden inside furniture at his game farm. (AP Photo/Nardus Engelbrecht, File)
The #farmgate scandal is only the latest example of dysfunction within the African National Congress. Critics warn that corruption and incompetence have become endemic, contributing to a massive breakdown in basic services.
A dearth of classical education causes everyone’s education to suffer.
Patrick CullinanJuly 05, 2022
In 1943, William F. Lynch, S.J., tackled a question many America writers would explore before and after: Is there such a thing as a Catholic imagination?
William LynchJuly 05, 2022
A lawn towel with the image of the American flag lies abandoned on a stretch of grass next to a road.
Cardinal Cupich, among others, expressed dismay at the recent mass shootings in Chicago and Philadelphia. Cupich repeated his call “to enact serious, broadly popular gun safety measures.”