Todo-Nada

Here is the coin carried by John of the Cross.
On one side: todo—everything—the gift.
On the other: nada—nothing—vacant space.
He fingered this penny every day,
touched the gift of God’s impinging love,
caressing the pain and suffering of empty space.
Well worn, this copper piece,
calluses on both thumb and forefinger.
John was in touch with the mystery,
the paradox of everything and nothing,
of life coming through Jesus
and a dying unto oneself.

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