Caritas Demands Help For Migrant Workers

Migrant workers, especially women employed in private homes, need more protection from abuse and exploitation, said Caritas Internationalis, the Vatican-based international umbrella organization for Catholic direct service and relief groups. In a statement on March 5, Caritas urged increased protections for migrants working as maids, nannies and caregivers, saying they often risk exploitation and trafficking. Migrants employed for domestic work rarely benefit from any legal protection in their workplaces, usually private homes, where abuse is difficult to detect. Domestic workers should have the same legal protection in the workplace as other workers do, Caritas said. “Apart from the risk of abuse, domestic workers may have no social security protection, can be overworked and underpaid,” said Martina Liebsch, director of policy for Caritas Internationalis. “Many fear their employers’ reprisals if they complain to the authorities and thus continue to live as modern-day slaves,” she said.

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Father Stanley Rother, a priest of the Oklahoma City Archdiocese who was brutally murdered in 1981 in the Guatemalan village where he ministered to the poor, is shown baptizing a child in this undated photo. (CNS) 
Before Father Rother died for his people, he had farmed with them, listened to them and spoken of God to them.
Terrance KleinJune 28, 2017
Pope Francis greets young refugees during a conference on families and adolescent education at Rome's Basilica of St. John Lateran on June 19. (CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano via Reuters)
“This is a pretty broad exception to the ban,” David Robinson says, “and it does allow for legitimate entry into the United States for people who can pass the screening process, which is what we want.”
Kevin ClarkeJune 28, 2017
The texture and variety of Stevens's new album creates liminal spaces between the sacred and the profane.
Reconnect Brooklyn is investing in people rather than properties, the residents who are struggling to remain in Bed-Stuy amid rising costs.
Wyatt MasseyJune 28, 2017