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Michael J. O’LoughlinFebruary 09, 2009

James Keyes holds a B.S. in business administration from Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, and in 2002 he was profiled in a BusinessWeek cover story, “The Good CEO,” which highlighted ethical CEOs who ran strong companies without bending the rules. Keyes was the chief executive officer at Johnson Controls, an automotive supplier in Glendale, WI, for over 15 years. During his tenure, annual revenue grew from $3 billion to $22 billion in 2003, when he retired. In December 2007 Keyes announced a gift of $7.2 million to Marquette’s College of Business Administration to endow the deanship. Keyes was director of LSI Corporation, a semiconductor manufacturer in California, and served on their board for 25 years. He was also chairman of the National Association of Manufacturers, a Washington, D.C.-based industry trade group. Keyes currently serves on the boards of two publicly traded companies, Navistar International, Inc., a truck producer in Illinois, and Pitney Bowes Inc., a Connecticut-based provider of postal equipment, as well as serving as a trustee of Fidelity Funds.

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