Stephen McGowan: CFO, Sun Mircosystems

Stephen McGowan, who holds an MBA from the Graduate School of Business at Loyola Chicago University, was the chief financial officer of Sun Microsystems from 2002 until 2006, when he then became the executive vice president for finance of the Santa Clara, CA-based technology company. McGowan has worked in the computer and financial worlds for over 30 years, and became CFO at Sun after rival computer-producer IBM drastically cut into Sun’s market share. McGowan was credited with overseeing highly productive legal, information technology, and sales departments at Sun. Prior to joining Sun, McGowan spent 17 years working at Digital Equipment Corporation in the United States and Canada. He also serves as a vice president of the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation, the development arm of the defense school whose mission it is to prepare “the intellectual leaders of tomorrow’s national and international security organizations.”

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. walks from the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, as he steers the Senate toward a crucial vote on the Republican health care bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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Without quite knowing it, I had begun to rely on the tradition of the Roman Catholic Church.
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A demonstration for affordable health care in New York City on July 13. Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, called on the Senate July 21 to fix problems with the Affordable Care Act in a more narrow way, rather than repeal it without an adequate replacement. (CNS photo/Andrew Gombert, EPA)
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