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May 2, 2005

Vol.192 / No.15

May 2, 2005

Sean McDonaghMay 02, 2005

In 1992 the then-chief executive of Monsanto, Robert Shapiro, told the Harvard Business Review that genetically modified crops will be necessary to feed a growing world population. He predicted that if population levels were to rise to 10 billion, humanity would face two options: either open up new

The Archdiocese of Boston recently completed an evaluation of the demographic and fiscal viability of parishes that resulted in a 25 percent reduction in the number of parishes. A principal reason for initiating this reconfiguration process was the fact that one-third of the pastors in Boston are ov

Letters
May 02, 2005

Toward Reconciliation

Catholicism, Death and Modern Medicine (4/25) was a splendid article by Lisa Sowle Cahill. Waiting until the dust settled on this traumatic event was wise and effective. We know that timing in such matters is of great importance. The crux of her argument lies in her

Editorials
The EditorsMay 02, 2005

A tug of war is taking placenot among children, though they may be grievously affected by this contest’s outcomebut between the federal government and the states. The struggle is over Medicaid, the entitlement program that guarantees health care for over 50 million low-income Americans. So far

Books
Robert F. WalchMay 02, 2005

Kishore Mahbubani rsquo s bittersweet assessment of the recent shortcomings of U S foreign policy will more than likely fall upon deaf ears The dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy in Singapore Mahbubani explains how American leaders have alienated governments around the world a fact

Books
George W. HuntMay 02, 2005

New York City in the year 1930 was simultaneously ascending and descending Its most ambitious project was the building of the world rsquo s tallest skyscraper unashamedly called the Empire State Building right in the heart of busy Manhattan Meanwhile its descent was less evident the stock ma

Books

Robert A Orsi Harvard Divinity School rsquo s Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America takes a complex approach to his own religion and academic disciplines drawing from his Italian-American family history to illustrate how mid-20th-century Catholics in the United States re