News Briefs

In 2011, 26 pastoral care workers were killed worldwide—18 priests, 4 religious sisters, 4 laypeople—as victims of crimes or in retribution for their activities on behalf of marginalized people. • A grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation will underwrite a survey of Catholic youth by the Secretariat of Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations to identify cultural traits that affect openness to a call to a vocation. • At St. Augustine High School in New Orleans, disciplinary paddling is officially over, as is a legal struggle over control of the school following an out-of-court settlement on Dec. 23, 2011. • The bishops of the Philippines are seeking funding for the construction of 1,000 houses for the victims of flooding in December that has claimed the lives of more than 1,200 people and left hundreds of thousands displaced. • Pope Benedict XVI will meet with Cuba’s President Raul Castro and Mexico’s President Felipe Calderón when he visits Cuba and Mexico on March 23-28. • Having celebrated their 75th birthdays, two U.S. cardinals and 20 other U.S. bishops will be eligible for retirement in the coming year.

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A woman holds up a sign during a rally against assisted suicide in 2016 on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. (CNS photo/Art Babych)
The American College of Physicians called for better promotion of palliative and hospice care, which opponents of physician-assisted suicide say are underutilized areas of medicine that could address concerns of patients facing difficult illnesses.
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 21, 2017
(CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
"We have a priest who makes everyone feel welcome, says Mass with great reverence and gives meaningful homilies"
Our readersSeptember 21, 2017
Photo by Victor Lozano on Unsplash
Any willingness to cooperate across party lines is praiseworthy. Unfortunately, brinkmanship remains the preferred legislative strategy.
The EditorsSeptember 21, 2017
Pope Francis, seen here at St. Peter's Square in the Vatican on June 28, has announced two significant reforms in recent weeks by releasing statements motu proprio. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
When a pope issues a document “motu proprio,” it means he does so by his own motivation, and it can mean a significant change to church law.
Michael J. O’LoughlinSeptember 21, 2017