‘Courtyard of Gentiles’ Comes to America

Father Hehir gestures during 'Faith, Culture and the Common Good' conference at Georgetown.

In the first U.S. implementation of the “Courtyard of the Gentiles,” a Vatican-sponsored structure for dialogue between believers and nonbelievers, conversations at Georgetown University on April 10 touched on the role of religion in society. The Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson described a recent visit to the Central African Republic. He found the situation there especially frightening because a sectarian conflict arose very quickly in a country that had a long history of peaceful interfaith mingling. Gerson said he was reminded that the multicultural and multifaith society of the United States is fragile and requires lots of work. Phil Zuckerman, a sociology professor at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif., said problems for the common good arise when a particular religious faith is linked with nationalism or becomes entwined with political power. The Rev. J. Bryan Hehir, secretary for health care and social services of the Archdiocese of Boston, said the balance of faith, culture and the common good depends much on how well a society accepts the common good as a goal.

 

Advertisement
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

I have found myself for the first time truly afraid of what it means to ask and to allow my children to be part of the church.
Kerry WeberAugust 15, 2018
Cardinal William H. Keeler in May 2009. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz) 
A Pennsylvania report accuses Keeler of covering up sexual abuse allegations while serving as bishop of Harrisburg.
Associated PressAugust 15, 2018
With her appeal to emotion, Gadsby reminds audiences to see the vulnerable, resilient human being behind the humiliated stand-up comic.
Allyson EscobarAugust 15, 2018
Boston Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley and Deacon Bernie Nojadera, executive director of the U.S. bishops' Secretariat for Child and Youth Protection, are pictured during the 2017 Catholic convocation in Orlando, Fla.  (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
“Our first job is to listen, to be empathetic,” said Deacon Bernie Nojadera, the executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Secretariat for the Protection of Children and Young People.