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Gloria PurvisMarch 30, 2022
Photo by Jordan Christian on Unsplash

A Reflection of the Wednesday of the Fourth Week of Lent


“But Zion said, “The LORD has forsaken me;
my Lord has forgotten me.”
Can a mother forget her infant,
be without tenderness for the child of her womb?
Even should she forget,
I will never forget you” (Is 49:14-15)

During Lent, we make plans for deeper conversion. Some of us refrain from eating certain foods, maybe a dish we like, or we avoid social media. Whatever the case, we are trying to discipline ourselves in some way. Sometimes, we don’t stick with what we planned. Sometimes, we completely abandon the good work we started.

We may fall into negative self-talk and convince ourselves it is futile to begin yet again. We may even wonder where God is when we fail. What does God think of us during these moments? Does God help us or has God forgotten us?

Today’s reading from Isaiah reminds us of the faithfulness of God. It reminds us that God never forgets us and that God is ever-present to us. God is with us even when we fail to continue the good work we started.

Like little children learning to walk, we might fall frequently, but we should remember God is there like a patient nurturing mother.

Like little children learning to walk, we might fall frequently, but we should remember God is there like a patient nurturing mother. God sees us stumble and urges us to get up and keep going. Like a mother urging and encouraging an unsteady toddler to keep walking, God gives support to our efforts.

Can we try again to pick up our Lenten practices? Can we be more resolved to continue what we have started or restarted? Let us drown out the negative self-talk with the reminders of the Prophet Isaiah that the Lord will cut a road through mountains and make highways level so we can get to him. The Lord comforts his people and shows mercy to the afflicted. We may be weak, but with the support of the Lord, we can and should continue or restart our Lenten practices.

Get to know Gloria Purvis, Host of “The Gloria Purvis Podcast


What are you giving up for Lent?

I am fasting on the appointed days and I am also focusing on praying the Liturgy of the Hours. So I suppose I am taking on a positive action of more prayer.

Do you cheat on Sundays?

No. I suppose there is no cheating when taking on good work.

Favorite non-meat recipe

Ingredients:

  • A can of big white beans
  • Olive oil
  • One onion
  • A few cloves of garlic
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Cooked Rice or cooked spaghetti or toast
  • Shredded cheese, optional

Cut up the onion and garlic. Sauté that in olive oil until the onion is soft. Then add the beans, heat it through, and drizzle with really good olive oil. Sprinkle it with salt and pepper or some cheese. Serve it with rice or toast or spaghetti, and fin you’re done.

Favorite Lenten hymn

Bach’s “O Sacred Head, Surrounded.”

More: Lent / Scripture

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