Prayer is not a burden. It is a way to rest.

The Virgin in Prayer by Sassoferrato, 1640-1650 (Wikimedia Commons)

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This week let’s look at a common problem: becoming burdened by prayer. Often I find with some of my spiritual directees that their prayer becomes a series of tasks. Many devout Christians end up, with the best intentions, overwhelmed by the great many things that they feel that they have to do in their daily prayer, as if prayer is just a “to do” list. For example, someone might say, “Well, in the morning, I start with the Morning Offering prayer, then I read the Breviary, then I read the Daily Mass readings, then I pray a Rosary for all those people in my life who are sick, then I pray for those who have died recently.”

Each of those prayer practices can be enriching and helpful. But sometimes people feel overwhelmed by a schedule like that. Frequently people who practice these kinds of routine speak of feeling overwhelmed or burdened or even unhappy. They sometimes come to prayer with a sense of dread, rather than anticipation. In response, I’ll usually tell them to drop one or two of those “to do” tasks that they have set themselves. Or leave the most burdensome out every other day.

What might be missing is some quiet, still time with God, where one can just sit and be in God’s presence in a wordless way.

Think of your relationship with God as a friendship. If the time you spend with a friend is filled with obligations, you might feel that any chance for spontaneity has gone. You might miss some free-wheeling time with him or her. So if you’re burdened with prayer, try to let some things go. “Come to me, all you who are heavy burdened,” as Jesus says. He wants to give you rest.

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Bridget Taumoepeau
1 week ago

This has been very much my experience. I was so keen to have a rather rigid routine with my prayer, but thanks to a wise spiritual director I have been gently guided to more of an awareness of Jesus in all that I do - a joyous companion, which feels much more like a relationship with God, than an obligation to be fulfilled. I also remember your story of your pre- novitiate retreat when you gradually saw Jesus as a friend and your director commented that you were beginnning to pray. Thanks for this lovely article which expresses so well my own journey - I just have watch I don’t take Jesus too much for granted - I have to do MY part to keep this friendship alive.

Michael Bindner
1 week ago

I was able to pray again when I was made to realize that God was in charge and did not need my advice. My best prayer is to love everyone (including my ex-wife) perfectly and expecting nothing in return (including my ex-wife). The worst prayer is to ask God to make someone change their mind, which is the darkest of magic.

Dr.Cajetan Coelho
1 week ago

Prayer heals.

J Cosgrove
6 days 19 hours ago

At noon each day I am reminded to pray by my computer/IPhone. I walk a lot in the morning, during lunch and after work. (we have a family business so I can go as I wish) So I often pray as I look around me on the walk.

A suggestion for the editors. Add “say a prayer before commenting:”

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