What does the pope do on vacation?

Pope Francis waves as he leaves his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican June 26, 2019. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

This week on “Inside the Vatican,” we talk about the pope’s address to a group of theologians in Naples, which included a call for online learning opportunities for refugees who want to study theology.

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Then, we update you on Cardinal Pell’s appeal case in Australia, and what awaits him after a decision is made. What effect will the civil court’s decision have on his church investigation? And where will he live if his civil appeal is successful?

Next, we get the scoop on that the pope does on vacation, and why he’s never stayed at the official papal vacation residence.

Finally, since it’s our last episode before our summer break, we’ll talk about some of the stories we’ll be keeping our eyes on over the next few months, including a visit by Vladimir Putin to Vatican City.

Links from the show:

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Craig B. Mckee
7 months 3 weeks ago

He listens to jokes:
­The Holy Trinity decides to go on a vacation. The Son proposes to go to San
Fransisco, but the Father finds that place too liberal minded. So the Father proposes to
go to Jerusalem. “I can’t go on vacation there!” says the Son, “That’s where I got killed! I
can’t believe you just said that!”A fight breaks out, and the Holy Spirit walks out. “If y’all
can’t come up with something when I come back, we’re not going anywhere!” An hour
later the Holy Spirit walks back into the room, and the Father and the Son excitedly say
they want to go to Rome. “Rome?” says the Holy Spirit, “Great idea! I’ve never been
there before!”

[Explore America’s in-depth coverage of Pope Francis.]

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