Searching for God, continually

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April 11/Fifth Thursday of Lent

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Seek the Lord and his strength; Search for his presence continually. ~ Ps 105:4

It’s the “continually” that causes difficulties, isn’t it? We manage to engage occasionally, perhaps seeking the Lord and his strength on Sundays when we go to church, or even a few times a week when we scratch out scant minutes for quiet prayer. But continually? Surely that is not a reasonable expectation for God to have of busy, bothered people like us. Indeed, as we go through each day and encounter a challenging student, a difficult client, a recalcitrant patient, an uncooperative colleague, a demanding partner—not to mention the pitiless flood of meetings, emails, phone calls, errands, and family obligations—it is easy to put our putative practice of the presence of God aside and tell ourselves we’ll get back to it later, when things have settled down. The psalmist is having none of it: his use of two different but oft-twinned verbs for “seek,” darash and baqash, underscores the importance of our making the effort to seek the Lord (an emphasis lost in most English translations). It is the process, not the outcome, that signifies, or as the 20th-century Trappist and writer Thomas Merton wrote, “I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you. And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing.” In today’s first reading, Abraham bears witness to the need to seek God continually. Through all the unexpected happenings in his life—the uprooting from Ur, the terrifying vision of God with its promise of countless descendants, the uneasy sojourn in Egypt, the late-life birth of a son—he continued to seek the Lord by keeping his covenant. It is that steady fidelity, the daily effort we make, that is important.

Eternal God, grant me the steadfastness and fidelity to seek your presence continually this day, in spite of all that would get in my way. Amen.

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J Cosgrove
3 months 1 week ago

Posted in a church in France:

It is possible that on entering this church, you may hear the Call of God. On the other hand, it is not likely that he will contact you by phone. Thank you for turning off your phone. If you would like to talk to God, come in, choose a quiet place, and talk to him. If you would like to see him, send him a text while driving

Andrew Di Liddo
3 months 1 week ago

I was taught as a child that if I get my little check mark on Sunday, I'm good to go! Now you're telling me that is not so! grrrrrrrrrrr ;-)~

Robert Landbeck
3 months 1 week ago

It remains the theological illusion of all tradition, that Christology offers a clear path or way to search and find the living G-d. That intellectual self deception and status quo will not hold for much longer!

[Editors’ note: This is part of a daily Lenten reflection series. Sign up for our America Today newsletter to receive each reflection every day in your inbox.]

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