Unpacking the pope’s document on young people

Pope Francis accepts a letter from Yadira Vieyra, a synod delegate from Chicago, before a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 10. Vieyra told the synod Oct. 12 that U.S. immigration policies are causing distress for migrants. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)

This week on “Inside the Vatican,” Gerard O’Connell and I take a look at the joint appeal signed by Pope Francis and King Mohammed VI of Morocco to keep the city of Jerusalem and its holy sites open to people of all faiths.

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Then, we unpack some of our main takeaways from Pope Francis’ new apostolic exhortation on young people, “Christus Vivit.” We’ll also look at some criticism of the letter and discuss the importance of looking at the entirety of documents like this one, rather than skipping over the spiritual insights and focusing solely on controversial issues.

Links from the show:

And you can see Gerry get a birthday cake from the pope here!

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J Cosgrove
5 months 2 weeks ago

I will ask this author or anyone who wants to respond. Why be a Catholic? What is special about the Church? With the implication that if you cannot answer it, then why should the youth remain in the Church?

John Barbieri
5 months 2 weeks ago

Precisely!

J Cosgrove
5 months 2 weeks ago

The reality is that this question is easily answered in the positive but not part of Catholic education anymore. The Pope has been forced to walk back some of his pronouncements. http://bit.ly/2TVMcXb Which brings to mind this video put out by Lutherans a couple years ago. http://bit.ly/1Owzfu9

Anna John
5 months 1 week ago

Good article. I liked the writing style very much. I admire Pope Francis. He's a very kind human being. flats for sale in kochi He's so right to be in that position. He's an inspiration for every human being. His influence on young people is unbelievable.

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