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Colleen DulleNovember 21, 2018
Pope Francis eats lunch with poor peoplePope Francis eats lunch with poor people as he marks World Day of the Poor at the Vatican Nov. 18. Some 1,500 people joined the pope for lunch in Paul VI hall. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

This week on “Inside the Vatican,” Gerry and I look into some new developments in the stories surrounding the U.S. bishops' delay of the vote on new sex abuse protocols. We also discuss the history of resistance to papal initiatives in the last 30 years. Is the current climate different from what happened during recent pontificates?

We’ll also look at Pope Francis’ recent initiatives to make “invisible people visible.” From creating shower and laundry facilities for the homeless in the Vatican to recent comments at the World Day of the Poor, Pope Francis is making it clear that giving to the poor is not just a fad under this pontificate, it’s what Christians are called to do.

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JR Cosgrove
5 years 7 months ago

Has Catholic infighting gotten worse?

I find this very strange. A headline about infighting and the main part of the short article about giving to the poor. The audio though is mainly about the infighting and a shorter segment about the poor. The infighting seems to be about the appointments by Francis and Cardinal Cupich is mainly discussed. Nothing about extreme poverty disappearing from the world despite extremely large increases in world population.

Eric Sundrup
5 years 7 months ago

Thanks for your comment. It looks like the embedded audio file didn't appear on the website when the article was first posted. It should be fixed now. You'll be able to listen to the audio discussion from the "Inside the Vatican" podcast. The audio content of the podcast focuses on the catholic infighting referenced in the headline.

Michael Barberi
5 years 7 months ago

A very confusing article given the fact that the content did not fit the headline.

Eric Sundrup
5 years 7 months ago

Michael,

Thanks for your comment. Please see the replies to Mark M and J Cosgrove.

J. Calpezzo
5 years 7 months ago

Confusing indeed. Some editor must be embarrassed. But to the point of the headline, Francis simply needs to get tough and crack some heads and thin out the ranks. The Burkes and Chaputs need to go.

Eric Sundrup
5 years 7 months ago

Thanks for your comment. Please see the replies to Mark M and J Cosgrove

John Mack
5 years 7 months ago

Lol, the headline was designed to stir up grumbling and infighting, and it succeeded. Happy Thanksgiving!

Eric Sundrup
5 years 7 months ago

Thanks for your comment. Please see the replies to Mark M and J Cosgrove

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