Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
FaithNews Analysis
Doug GirardotSarah VincentJames T. Keane
In a year filled with good news and bad, more than a few Catholics stood out in the crowd (for better or for worse).
Pope Francis greets asylum-seekers transferred from Cyprus to Italy with his help, during a meeting at the Vatican Dec. 17, 2021. The migrants are being assisted by the Vatican and the Community of Sant'Egidio. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Kevin Clarke
Here’s a rundown of some of the issues the pope tried to keep at the forefront of the news in 2021 and articles about them you may have missed.
FaithNews Analysis
Steven P. Millies
At one point Ronald Reagan needed a powerful ally who could help him hold on to Catholic voters — and he found that ally in John Paul II. Today, Joe Biden faces a similar situation.
In this March 30, 2021, file photo, anti-abortion rights demonstrators gather in the rotunda at the Capitol while the Senate debated anti-abortion bills in Austin, Texas. Young people on social media have found a way to protest Texas' new law banning most abortions by focusing on a website established by the state's largest anti-abortion group that takes in tips on violations. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Ellen K. Boegel
The Texas Heartbeat Act is an extraordinary departure from legal norms. The law empowers “any person,” other than a government official, to sue everyone involved in performing an abortion after the detection of fetal “cardiac activity.”
FaithNews Analysis
Colleen Dulle
How did a Catholic TV station known for its prayer programs get involved in broadcasting attacks on the pope that he felt compelled to publicly denounce as “the work of the devil”?
U.S. Customs and Border Protection mounted officers attempt to contain migrants as they cross the Rio Grande from Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, into Del Rio, Texas, Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021. Thousands of Haitian migrants have been arriving to Del Rio, Texas, as authorities attempt to close the border to stop the flow of migrants. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez)
Politics & SocietyNews Analysis
Kevin Clarke
With the likelihood that migration to the U.S. border will only increase in the near term, U.S. officials need to shore up existing structures and create new ones.