A prayer for wildfire victims

The Nuns Fire in Sonoma County, California on Oct. 10. (CNS photo/Stephen Lam, Reuters)The Nuns Fire in Sonoma County, California on Oct. 10. (CNS photo/Stephen Lam, Reuters)

Almighty God, who alone created the beauty and the bounty of our land, who cares and loves everyone—from the workers in the field to the owners of the field—be with your people in California now in the midst of the fires.

Bring an end to the loss of lives and the loss of homes. Bring aid to the firefighters who, by serving others, serve you. Give them courage and strength to persevere, to find the ability in their bodies and souls to keep working for another day or hour or minute. Ease the winds that spread the flames and disperse the smoke that covers the sky.

Bring hope to the displaced and the homeless. Keep alive inside their minds and hearts memories, the physical traces of which may be lost. Remind us that you are the promise of a new tomorrow.

Bring rest and peace to those who have been lost, and let their souls find eternal life with you. Be a comfort and relief to the grieving.

As the cities are rebuilt, may no one be left behind. May all be remembered as you remember all. As you led the Hebrew people through the desert, lead your people now, God. From immigrants who face unique obstacles to farmworkers who continue to labor in the fields despite dangerous smoke to families who have lost loved ones to those who have lost everything they have built over a lifetime, may all be included and cared for as we rebuild, guided by your Spirit. May our hearts never turn away from you or from each other in our time of need. May we see you in the faces of those in need. May we see your work in the hands of all those who reach out to help and in the green—the life!—that will soon return, by your hand, to our land.

Amen.

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