New book from Pope Benedict addresses resignation and 'gay lobby' in the Vatican

Pope Francis greets retired Pope Benedict XVI during a June 28 ceremony at the Vatican marking the 65th anniversary of the retired pope's priestly ordination. (CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano) Pope Francis greets retired Pope Benedict XVI during a June 28 ceremony at the Vatican marking the 65th anniversary of the retired pope's priestly ordination. (CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano)

Retired Pope Benedict XVI has given another interview to the journalist and author Peter Seewald, and a German publisher announced it would be released worldwide on Sept. 9.

Titled Letzte Gesprache, (which translates as "last conversations"), the book includes an in-depth conversation with the retired pope about the background of his resignation in 2013, said the German publisher, Droemer Knaur.

Advertisement

Information about an English translation and publisher was not immediately available.

The Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera, which has the rights to an Italian newsstand edition of the book, reported July 1 that Pope Benedict admits to Seewald that he knew of "the presence of a 'gay lobby' in the Vatican composed of four or five people and he says he was able to remove their power."

Pope Benedict also says he kept a diary during his pontificate, but he plans to destroy it, even though he knows that historians could find it valuable, Corriere reported.

On its website, Droemer said Pope Benedict speaks about the priorities of his pontificate, the VatiLeaks scandal, which saw the conviction and jailing of his butler, and about Pope Francis and the "controversial issues" of his papacy.

Pope Benedict discusses the challenges facing the Catholic Church today, but also looks back to memories of his family and formative events in his life, Droemer said.

The retired pope speaks of his "surprise" when Pope Francis was elected and his "joy" in seeing how the new pope prays in public and is able to communicate with a crowd, Corriere reported. He also discusses the ways in which he and Pope Francis are alike and are different.

Before he was elected pope, then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger collaborated with Seewald on two book-length interviews: Salt of the Earth, published in German in 1996, and God and the World, published in German in 2000. As pope, he and Seewald released Light of the World in 2010.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Carlos Orozco
1 year 4 months ago
This book will be a very, very interesting read. That the homosexual agenda infiltrated even very high offices in the Vatican, creating a "gay lobby", should awaken Catholics to the dangers such wolves disguised as sheep pose to the Church. Has such a lobby been completely dismantled? I think not. It is not a conspiracy theory, but a concrete reality Benedict XVI witnessed. To fail to accept such a reality would be to call him a liar.
J Scanlon
1 year 4 months ago
I think you are correct. The LGBT agenda is not a myth. It hopes to establish itself in law and the Church. The fact of the promiscuous nature of male homosexual conduct seems to be overlooked by too many in the Church when affirming its supposed worthiness. It is sinful conduct but in the effort to love the sinner the sin is lost sight of.
Frank Elliott
1 year 2 months ago
Can you really be so stupid that you don't recognize that BXVI retired with his boyfriend?

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Images: CNS/Composite: America
On Nov. 11, the Catholic Church lost a moral titan in the long struggle for racial equality and justice in the United States.
Shannen Dee WilliamsNovember 22, 2017
Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, Myanmar military commander-in-chief, speaks during the Union Peace Conference Aug. 31 in Naypyitaw (CNS photo/Hein Htet, EPA).
Gen. Min Aung Hlaing wields great political power in the country.
Jacob Tremblay and Julia Roberts in “Wonder” (CNS photo/Lionsgate). 
‘Wonder’ is a tween melodrama on a mission of mercy.
Simcha FisherNovember 22, 2017
The change was in “no way” a response to the C.C.H.D.’s persistent online critics, an archdiocesan official says.
Kevin ClarkeNovember 22, 2017