The newness of biblical religion

"The Garden of Eden" by Thomas Cole (c.1828)

Commenting on a series of videos from Conservation International, Bishop-elect Fr. Robert Barron recently posted an essay that included this insightful reflection on the revolution of Biblical religion:

Biblical religion represents something altogether new, a fact signaled in the opening verses of the book of Genesis, where it is emphatically stated that God creates earth, sky, the stars and planets, the animals that move upon the earth and the fishes that inhabit the ocean depths. All of these natural elements were, at one time or another, worshipped as divine. So even as he celebrates them, the author of Genesis is effectively dethroning them, desacralizing them. Nature is wonderful indeed, he is telling us; but it is not God. And the consistent Biblical message is that this Creator God is not like the arbitrary and capricious gods of the ancient world; rather, he is reliable, rock-like in his steadfast love, more dedicated to human beings than a mother is to her child.
 

See the rest of his essay here.

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