Catholic Commencement Speakers: Part II

A number of Catholic colleges and universities have still not announced their commencement speakers for the upcoming graduation ceremonies (only weeks away), but I've started compiling a list of those who have. It's always interesting to see who's speaking where. See below for part II and here for part I of the series.

Canisius College 

Advertisement

Catherine M. Burzik

Providence College

 Darlene Love

University of San Diego

Fr. Gregory Boyle, S.J.

University of San Francisco

Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, San Francisco Chronicle

Sylvia Alice Earle, National Geographic Explorer in Residence

Saint Joseph's University

Michael A. Nutter, Mayor of Philadelphia

Saint Peter's University

William Brooks, President and CEO of the NAACP

Seton Hall

Seton Hall is forgoing a keynote commencement speaker in favor of student speeches

Stonehill College

Kenneth Feinberg

Wheeling Jesuit University

U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy

Wyoming Catholic College

Bishop Paul Etienne, Diocese of Cheyenne

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

“To love the poor means to combat all forms of poverty, spiritual and material."
Gerard O’ConnellNovember 19, 2017
Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago speaks Nov. 13 during the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
Cardinal Bernardin’s consistent ethic of life could be helpful as the church grapples with issues like migration, health care and even taxes, some bishops say.
Michael J. O’LoughlinNovember 17, 2017
Giant machines dig for brown coal at the open-cast mining Garzweiler in front of a power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany in April 2014. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
“What we need to do is just continue to live out the challenge of ‘Laudato Si’,’ which is to examine our relationship with the earth, with God and with each other to see how we can become better stewards of this gift of the earth.”
Kevin ClarkeNovember 17, 2017
Hipsters love the authentic, the craft and the obscure—which is exactly why Catholicism, in its practices and its aesthetic, is perfectly suited for them.
Zac DavisNovember 17, 2017