Cal State, Charging for Success?

When I first read about the story below, I thought of airlines charging additional fees for checked baggage, food and beverage, and every other service and perk that used to be free.

According to the Los Angeles Times, various California State University campuses (Fullerton, Dominguez Hills, Fresno and San Diego) are considering the implementation of "student success fees" ranging from $200 to $500 per semester. If these schools go ahead and approve them, they will join a number of other Cal State campuses already charging them. According to the article,

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The "success fees" are a relatively recent phenomenon that troubles many opponents, who argue that students shouldn't have to pay extra for instructional programs that should be included in tuition. The most recent proposals also flout promises made to lawmakers and the governor to freeze costs in return for additional state funding, they contend.

The charges "might be a way for campuses to do an end-run around the tuition freeze, and we want to make sure the system is still truly affordable," said Miles Nevin, executive director of the California State Student Assn.

Why the need to charge additional fees? Campus leaders claim that "their universities haven't recovered from years of cuts that amounted to $1 billion systemwide. They say they are being forced to look to students to help pay for more class offerings, upgraded classrooms, faculty hiring, expanded counseling and other services. Typically, these are covered by tuition and state funding."

I don't know much about the internal administration of the Cal State system, but are there robust fundraising infrastructures within the schools? I realize that tuition and state funding have traditionally covered the cost, but the viability of the Cal State and other public systems may eventually (sooner rather than later) depend upon a model that, for example, Catholic schools follow. Catholic schools don't exist without extensive, constant efforts to raise money. For readers in the know, is this a potential path for Cal State? Or is it perhaps something else -- for example, contraction? I would appreciate some reader insight. 

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