Word Columns for August 19

This Sunday is the 20th in Ordinary Time. Fr. Daniel Harrington writes that Luke’s Gospel reading, "presents three initially puzzling sayings of Jesus. He proclaims that he has come to light a fire on earth, to undergo a baptism of death and to bring division rather than peace. What happened to angels singing about peace on earth and Jesus the prince of peace?" Fr. John Donahue notes that "this harshness has a precedent in the vocation of Old Testament prophets, who were distinguished from those false prophets who supported unjust kings and structures by proclaiming peace and prosperity. Jeremiah states twice, ’They have healed the wound of my people lightly, saying, "Peace, peace," when there is no peace’ (6:14; 8:10-12), and Ezekiel compares false prophetic messages of peace to covering a wall with whitewash (13:10)." There was no 20th Sunday in OT in 2004, so there is no reflection from Sr. Dianne Bergant available this week. Tim Reidy, Online Editor
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

In “Sorry to Bother You,” the system’s greatest threat—literal ownership of your time and person—is also its promise of relief.
Eve TushnetJuly 17, 2018
St. Michael Cathedral in Tha Rae, Thailand (iStock photo)
During the cave crisis, at the Cathedral of Saint Michael in Thare, a small village located along Nonghan Lake in northeastern Thailand’s Isaan region, Catholics offered Mass and asked for the intervention of St. Michael the Archangel to protect the young men.
The Catholic Church has renewed efforts to fight racism in the U.S., but Black Lives Matter deserves credit for keeping our attention on racial justice.
Olga SeguraJuly 17, 2018
What can the church do to help repent for the sins of leaders like Cardinal McCarrick and all those who turned a blind eye to his wrongdoing?
The EditorsJuly 17, 2018