Isaiah's Promise

The reading from Isaiah, nicely picked up by the response--Psalm 122--takes us to Zion: the hill on which Jerusalem sat, where the temple rested, whence royal Davidic enterprises worked, and most important of all, where stood God’s cosmic throne, rooted deep in the earth and brushing the heavens. The main voice speaking here seems to have been an 8th century prophet (later attracting and accumulating additional material from the sixth-century exile and the fifth-century return) who had the challenge of advising several kings of Judah not to antagonize by any action they might contemplate the powerful and hungry Assyrian empire to the north. In this short passage, we hear the voices of "Gentile" and "Jew" intone respectfully, even antiphonally: "Let us climb the Lord’s mountain...."; "Let us walk in the light of the Lord...." They are drawn to the gentle hill of Jerusalem which the prophet, with characteristic love of exaggeration and contrast, glorifies into earth’s highest mountain. There they seek its resources: strength, joy, instruction, justice, peace. Conscious of the descendants of these eager pilgrims assembling at Annapolis, it seems urgent that we join our hearts with those in their midst who seek God’s gifts that Isaiah promises and that we turn our own feet and hands, lips and hearts, to whatever deeds of peace we can contribute in solidarity to the cosmos. Barbara Green, O.P.
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

It is astonishing to think that God would choose to enter the world this way: as a fragile newborn who could not even hold up his own head without help.
Ginny Kubitz MoyerOctober 20, 2017
Protestors rally to support Temporary Protected Status near the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Sept. 26. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
Around 200,000 Salvadorans and 57,000 Hondurans have been residing in the United States for more than 15 years under Temporary Protected Status. But that status is set to expire in early 2018.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 20, 2017
At the heart of Anne Frank’s life and witness is a hopeful faith in humanity.
Leo J. O'Donovan, S.J.October 20, 2017
Forensic police work on the main road in Bidnija, Malta, which leads to Daphne Caruana Galizias house, looking for evidence on the blast that killed the journalist as she was leaving her home, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. Caruana Galizia, a harsh critic of Maltese Premier Joseph Muscat, and who reported extensively on corruption on Malta, was killed by a car bomb on Monday. (AP Photo/Rene Rossignaud)
Rarely does the death of a private citizen elicit a formal letter of condolence from the Pope.