Feast of John Bosco - Jan. 31

Many avocations contribute greatly to the well-being of all of us, to whatever happiness we might have on this earth. Among these avoctions is teaching. And a great promoter of teaching us when we first need learning is John Bosco. His feast day, January 31, recalls the vital significance of teaching and learning. Ignatius of Loyola, though not a teacher, moved quickly when he saw the importance of teaching the truths of faith; his impulse in this direction to save souls moved him and his confreres to include other subjects of human study such as letters and grammar. Ignatius was quite careful in his words to high officials. Thus his words to Philip II of Spain are a beacon in the world of values; at the time of Ignatius’ founding of the Roman College, he said to the king through his spokesman: "all the good of Christianity and the world depends on the good education of the young" (1556). Don Bosco developed an entire religious order on this principle. Many others have seen that their best contribution to their own and succeeding generations lies in teaching the young. Is it surprising to say that, within the context of his announcing the kingdom of God and of calling for repentance, Jesus was generally described as teacher? God knows what He made when He made the human intellect to be the guide to choosing salvation. May we fulfill our destiny to be learners, for our happiness. John Kilgallen, SJ
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