Reasons for poping Anglicans to be nervous

Reuters FaithWorld blog has accounts by two Church of England priests who became Catholics in the early 1990s, one of whom reverted after realising the depth of pain and controversy his move caused among those he loved. The other seems very happy, and only misses congregational singing and old churches (his North London Catholic parish is a "1970s disaster").

Meanwhile, the Bishop of Ebbsfleet -- one of five Church of England bishops being received into the Catholic Church in the New Year -- gave his last sermon as Anglican bishop last Saturday; it is moving, even if typical of the self-absorption of the man who is at last following his calling, and can think of little beyond what he is giving up.

Advertisement

Remember Newman's agonies, and the rejections and insults which followed his decision for Rome? It doesn't seem much easier, even now.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
7 years 1 month ago
In your article you have a strong contradiction. You first revile the bishop for not following his calling to the Church sooner "it is moving, even typica of the sef-absorptoin of the man who is at last following his calling.." Then you say he has no idea what he is giving up. You can't say he self-absorbed for not joining the Church sooner and then selfish for not thinking of others in the move.  It seems that he cannot win with you. I'm personally happy that he is making to the move to Christ's Church and such things can be very hard. Sometimes your decisons to follow Christ's call is unpopular as in the gospel's he often encourages people to give up everything for Him no matter what it does to that person's family. In doing so it is trusting that God will take care of all because you are doing His will. As St. Therese Lisieux said, "Perfection consists in doing God's will and being what He wills us to be."
Daniel Searby
7 years 1 month ago
Mr. Ivereigh, I hope your remarks are not representative of the welcome Catholics extend to Anglicans who bravely cross over to the Ordinariates.  These are both prayerful and painful decisions, and not ''self absorbtion'' as you characterize Bishop Burnham's farewell sermon.  Like Newman before him, Bishop Burnham is leaving great treasures behind - many of his friends, colleagues and all the material comforts of an Anglican Bishopric, as he pursues the Pearl of Great Price.  He and all Anglicans who make this journey deserve our support and hospitality - it is the Christian thing to do.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Supporters of opposition presidential candidate Salvador Nasralla clash with military police in the Policarpo Paz Garcia neighborhood of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on Jan. 20, 2018. Following a disputed election marred by irregularities, incumbent President Juan Orlando Hernandez was declared the victor and will be inaugurated on Jan. 27. The opposition does not recognize Hernandez's victory and are protesting against the result. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio)
“You will see many protests during his mandate...because Honduras hasn’t fixed its age-old problems of inequality, exclusion, poor educational and health system, corruption and impunity.”
Melissa VidaJanuary 23, 2018
I want to be able to serve the state better. I want to be able to serve more of the state.
Nathan SchneiderJanuary 23, 2018
Formed in 2011, The Oh Hellos' Christianity is one of their foundational inspirations, evident in lines like "the only God I should have loved."
Colleen DulleJanuary 23, 2018
People gather at a June 14 candlelight vigil in Manila, Philippines, in memory of the victims of the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. Philippine Catholic bishops called for vigilance against bullying, ostracism and harassment of gay people in the wake of the incident in which police said a lone gunman killed 49 people early June 12 at the club. (CNS photo/Mark R. Cristino, EPA)
“We are losing three generations of people, and we need to hear why,” said Bishop Mark O’Connell.
Michael J. O’LoughlinJanuary 23, 2018