Reasons for poping Anglicans to be nervous

Reuters FaithWorld blog has accounts by two Church of England priests who became Catholics in the early 1990s, one of whom reverted after realising the depth of pain and controversy his move caused among those he loved. The other seems very happy, and only misses congregational singing and old churches (his North London Catholic parish is a "1970s disaster").

Meanwhile, the Bishop of Ebbsfleet -- one of five Church of England bishops being received into the Catholic Church in the New Year -- gave his last sermon as Anglican bishop last Saturday; it is moving, even if typical of the self-absorption of the man who is at last following his calling, and can think of little beyond what he is giving up.

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Remember Newman's agonies, and the rejections and insults which followed his decision for Rome? It doesn't seem much easier, even now.

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7 years 10 months ago
In your article you have a strong contradiction. You first revile the bishop for not following his calling to the Church sooner "it is moving, even typica of the sef-absorptoin of the man who is at last following his calling.." Then you say he has no idea what he is giving up. You can't say he self-absorbed for not joining the Church sooner and then selfish for not thinking of others in the move.  It seems that he cannot win with you. I'm personally happy that he is making to the move to Christ's Church and such things can be very hard. Sometimes your decisons to follow Christ's call is unpopular as in the gospel's he often encourages people to give up everything for Him no matter what it does to that person's family. In doing so it is trusting that God will take care of all because you are doing His will. As St. Therese Lisieux said, "Perfection consists in doing God's will and being what He wills us to be."
Daniel Searby
7 years 10 months ago
Mr. Ivereigh, I hope your remarks are not representative of the welcome Catholics extend to Anglicans who bravely cross over to the Ordinariates.  These are both prayerful and painful decisions, and not ''self absorbtion'' as you characterize Bishop Burnham's farewell sermon.  Like Newman before him, Bishop Burnham is leaving great treasures behind - many of his friends, colleagues and all the material comforts of an Anglican Bishopric, as he pursues the Pearl of Great Price.  He and all Anglicans who make this journey deserve our support and hospitality - it is the Christian thing to do.

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