Nuns Challenge McDonald's

From NPR:

The Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia say McDonald's has some explaining to do.

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They want the company to report to the world on what it's doing to address the public's concerns about the health effects of fast food. They are especially interested in how the fare affects kids. The nuns also want to know how these concerns and changes in public policy could affect the company's prospects.

The nuns, holders of more than $2,000 worth of McDonald's stock, have managed to get their question on the preliminary list of proposals that could come to a vote at the company's annual meeting this spring.

Here's the text of the question they want put to a vote:

RESOLVED: Shareholders ask the Board of Directors to issue a report, at reasonable expense and excluding proprietary information, within six months of the 2011 annual meeting, assessing the company's policy responses to public concerns regarding linkages of fast food to childhood obesity, diet-related diseases and other impacts on children's health. Such report should include an assessment of the potential impacts of public concerns and evolving public policy on the company's finances and operations.

Read the rest here.

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Juan Lino
6 years 11 months ago
I admire the nuns creativity very much!!  Give the golden arches hell Sisters!
6 years 11 months ago
I'm with David on this, but would add that where it is not obvious, those who knowingly produce unhealthy/dangerous products should have a reasonable obligation to reveal those health risks and dangers so that society can make informed decisions.  I don't think anyone is reasonably unaware of the health risks posed by fast food, even the (gasp) hot coffee that they sell.

So I'm guessing that the nuns aren't stockholders as a way to pay for thee heating bills in the convent?
6 years 11 months ago
Now why is that big, bad, mean ole' Vatican pickin' on these good Sisters?!?!

*roll eyes*
Jim McCrea
6 years 11 months ago
How dare they!  They should be in the convent, ironing the altar linens and cooking lunch for The Good Fathuh, don't you know.
Marie Rehbein
6 years 11 months ago
I would say that the nuns discredit themselves by undertaking these kinds of initiatives (I'm thinking also of the one pertaining to the purchase of bottled water).  It does almost make a person think that time and effort would be better spent ironing linens and cooking lunch.  People, generally, know that a steady diet of McDonald's food is unhealthy.  However, once in a while, I like to eat a burger and fries, and it's nice that I can get one for a comparatively low price and without buying a pound of ground beef that I then have to use up.  Similarly, if I buy water in bottles and drink that instead of soda, why is that bottle a worse offense against the environment than the soda bottle or can that I might otherwise have had?  Meanwhile, it's hard to find teachers for our Catholic school. 
jessie ashely
6 years 10 months ago
Now there are seldom health food. So disappoint.
Thanks for sharing with us! It is really worthy of our reading.

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