In The News, August 13th

The United States State Department creates the Office for Engagement with Faith-Based Communities headed by Shaun Casey, professor of Christian ethics at Wesley Theological Seminary. 

North Carolina is sued after Gov. Patrick McCrory signed a voting reform bill, requiring strict photo identification, into law.

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A federal judge dismissed the racial discrimination claims against Paula Deen, formerly of the Food Network, ruling that because the former employee is white she can not be a victim of racial discrimination.

Pope Francis met with members of the Argentine and Italian national soccer teams who are in Rome for a friendly match in celebration of his pontificate. As a football fan, Pope Francis believes there is a spiritual dimension to the match.

Infamous South Boston mobster, James (Whitey) Bulger, was convicted of 11 murders and an array of other crimes.

The mysterious ‘angel’ priest in Missouri has been identified as Father Patrick Dowling of the Diocese of Jefferson City.

As the International Day of Indigenous Peoples is celebrated, Msgr. Escobar Galicia, Bishop de Teotihuacan, in Mexico, echoes the call from Blessed John Paul II to promote the rights of indigenous people who are often marginalized in his country.

Mexican bishop calls for solidarity with the more than 20 people missing in his diocese. 

From the Vatican, Pope Francis urges better relationships between Muslim and Christian worlds as Ramadan comes to a close. 

A Tennesse judge changes baby's name from Messiah to Martin, believing that having the title would cause hardships growing up in the predominantly Christian area. 

Sinkhole in Florida caused the partial collapse of a resort villa today, destruction continuing as day progresses. 

In New York today a judge ruled that the stop-and-frisk tactics used by the NYPD have been violating the constitutional rights of innocent people. 

Around the world, economic expansion in Japan seems to be slowing down. 

Extremist attacks on Christian villages in the Central African Republic kill 15 and leave around 1000 homeless. 

As Sacramento bishop blesses pilgrims marching for immigration reform, Britain considers legal action against Spain over Gibraltar border checks. 

 

 

 

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