This, A Gospel

In the beginning my beginning hummed
with the sound of a thousand other beginnings.
Now, when I say light, I stare away from sun
& into your body. If I am to be in possession
of anything, I want it to be my state of witness.
How difficult to see the consanguinity of rivers,
one leading toward one, the air the blown kiss
swims & the kiss itself, its fist & fever.
We are born of word & the word travels.
You hear it at night, the train’s rattling moan,
dust’s physicality, a country of mothers unraveling
& your heart beating out of you a mountain.
See this flesh of words, this song, yes, see this
dying. Who can live through it without crying.

Now, when I say light, I stare away from sun
& into your body.

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