Voices
Michael J. O’Loughlin is the national correspondent for America and host of the America podcast "Plague: Untold Stories of AIDS and the Catholic Church."
President Donald Trump speaks with reporters before departing on Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Tuesday, June 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Politics & Society News
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 23, 2020
Few questions dealt directly with Catholicism, but host Raymond Arroyo did ask the president about a letter written by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò.
Activists and supporters block the street outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington Oct. 8, 2019, as it hears arguments in three major employment discrimination cases on whether federal civil rights law prohibiting workplace discrimination on the "basis of sex" covers gay and transgender employees. (CNS photo/Jonathan Ernst, Reuters)
Politics & Society Explainer
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 19, 2020
The short answer is: it is unlikely.
U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted June 11 that he was "honored" by an open letter written by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, who served as nuncio to the United States from 2011 to 2016. In the letter, the former nuncio claimed that lockdown restrictions and unrest in the United States were part of a plot to establish a new world order. (CNS photo/Twitter)
Faith News Analysis
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 11, 2020
The views put forth by Archbishop Viganò in his letter to the president are far outside the mainstream of U.S. and global Catholicism.
A man in Washington holds up a child during a protest against racial inequality June 6, 2020. Demonstrations continue after a white police officer in Minnesota was caught on a bystander's video May 25 pressing his knee into the neck of George Floyd, an African American, who was later pronounced dead at a hospital. (CNS photo/Eric Thayer, Reuters)
Politics & Society News
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 08, 2020
“Let it be agonizing, let it be overwhelming because frankly it’s agonizing for me, too. It’s overwhelming for me, too,” Father Bryan Massingale said.
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit the St. John Paul II National Shrine, in Washington, D.C., on June 2. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Politics & Society News
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 04, 2020
A new P.R.R.I. poll suggests that President Trump is losing ground among white Catholics faster than among other major religious groups, reports Michael J. O’Loughlin.
 Bishop Mark J. Seitz of the Diocese of El Paso, Texas, kneels at El Paso's Memorial Park holding a Black Lives Matter sign June 1, 2020. Bishop Seitz and other clergy from the Diocese of El Paso, prayed and kneeled for eight minutes, the time George Floyd, an unarmed black man, was said to have spent under a police officer's knee before becoming unconscious and later dying May 25, 2020. (CNS photo/Fernie Ceniceros, courtesy Diocese of El Paso)
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 03, 2020
“Pope Francis expressed his gratitude to the bishops for their pastoral tone in the church’s response to the demonstrations across the country in their statements and actions since the death of George Floyd.”
Politics & Society Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 02, 2020
Archbishop Gregory: “I find it baffling and reprehensible that any Catholic facility would allow itself to be so egregiously misused and manipulated in a fashion that violates our religious principles.”
Terrence Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, reacts at a makeshift memorial at the spot where he was taken into custody in Minneapolis June 1, 2020. Demonstrations continue after a white police officer was caught on a bystander's video May 25 pressing his knee into the neck of George Floyd, an African American, who later died at a hospital. (CNS photo/Lucas Jackson, Reuters)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Michael J. O’LoughlinJune 01, 2020
“You can only oppress people so long before things tend to erupt.”
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinMay 27, 2020
Asked if he thinks Communion can be distributed safely, Dr. Fauci said “no,” especially in areas still getting the virus under control.
Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis prays in front of the Blessed Sacrament at the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul on March 27. (CNS photo/Dave Hrbacek, The Catholic Spirit)
Faith News
Michael J. O’LoughlinMay 21, 2020
Catholic dioceses throughout the United States are making decisions on their own, resulting in a hodgepodge of procedures and protocols.