Voices
Kevin Clarke is America’s chief correspondent and the author of Oscar Romero: Love Must Win Out (Liturgical Press).
A memorial service for George Floyd at North Central University, in Minneapolis, on June 4, 2020. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Kevin Clarke
Minneapolis police have used force against African-American residents seven times more often than against white residents over the past five years, reports Kevin Clarke.
achel Perez of Minneapolis is pictured May 28, 2020, with injuries sustained from rubber bullets during protests while standing a distance from a burning vehicle at the parking lot of a Target store. (CNS photo/Carlos Barria, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyNews
Kevin Clarke
“We cannot turn a blind eye to these atrocities and yet still try to profess to respect every human life,” the bishops said. “We serve a God of love, mercy, and justice.”
Signs made by Cook County Jail prisoners in Chicago plead for help April 7, 2020, during the coronavirus pandemic. (CNS photo/Jim Vondruska, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyNews
Kevin Clarke
Another near-invisible community similarly faces a serious and disproportionate threat from Covid-19; the people who live and work behind bars in the United States.
Migrant workers crowd outside a bus station in Ghaziabad, India, March 28, 2020, as they wait to board buses to return to their villages during a 21-day nationwide lockdown to limit the spread of COVID-19. (CNS photo/Anushree Fadnavis, Reuters)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Kevin Clarke
On March 25, hoping to suppress the spread of the coronavirus, India began the world’s largest lockdown, affecting 1.3 billion people. But the sudden move to close down all but essential services threw millions out of work and began a desperate exodus of migrant and day laborers out of the big cities.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Kevin Clarke
As much as 75 percent of Lebanon’s population is in need of emergency assistance.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Kevin Clarke
Health work during a pandemic can be dangerous and the thought of falling ill themselves cannot be too far from the minds of medical and sanitation teams. But thousands of other relief and development staff and volunteers will face many of the same risks and fears.
Posters encouraging participation in the 2020 census in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Kevin Clarke
The U.S. census has long had trouble counting groups like young children, reports Kevin Clarke, and the coronavirus is likely to throw the accuracy of the data into deeper doubt.
Politics & SocietyDispatches
Kevin Clarke
“We cannot let this moment of pandemic, which calls us all to unity as God’s children, become the occasion for further prejudice, exclusion and injustice.”
FaithVatican Dispatch
Kevin Clarke
Pope Francis said in an Easter Sunday message that the coronavirus epidemic could also be an opportunity for affluent societies to re-evaluate patterns of consumption and exploitation.
A grandmother who has been part of a Catholic Relief Services' program for family nutrition shares her lunch with her youngest of seven grandchildren in the kitchen of the family home in Konjiko, Kenya, in May 2019. Lenten alms donated through the CRS Rice Bowl program support the agency's work in roughly 45 different countries. (CNS photo/Georgina Goodwin for Catholic Relief Services) 
Politics & SocietyNews
Kevin Clarke
While the Covid-19 pandemic provokes a series of unprecedented measures, other ongoing challenges to human life and dignity—drought, famine, armed conflict and poverty among them—are not offering a time-out from the suffering they inflict.