Syria

The Catholic aid agency Caritas Syria is working around the clock to aid those displaced by Turkish bombing and shelling.
Members of Syrian National Army, known as the Free Syrian Army, react as they drive on top of an armored vehicle Oct. 11, 2019, in the Turkish border town of Ceylanpinar. Dozens of advocacy organizations participating in the International Religious Freedom Roundtable called on U.S. President Donald Trump "not to abandon Christians, Yazidis and Kurds" in the Syrian border region that Turkey is bombing. (CNS photo/Murad Sezer, Reuters)
Kevin Clarke October 12, 2019
Bashar Warda, C.Ss.R., the Chaldean Catholic Archbishop of Erbil in Iraqi-Kurdistan, urged all parties in the new conflict between Turkey and the Kurdish and allied militias of the Syrian Democratic Forces “to remember at all times their obligations to protect innocent civilians.”
Turkish warplanes have begun attacking northeastern Syria, causing widespread panic among Christian and other religious communities caught up in the aerial bombardments.
Pope Francis urged Syrian President Bashar Assad to put an end to his country's eight-year-long conflict and seek reconciliation for the good of the nation and its vulnerable people.
Military Council member Aram Hanna told Kurdistan 24 TV that he hopes a U.S.-led coalition would protect northeast Syria because Islamic State "sleeper cells still pose a threat."
The prelates noted that Christians "are an authentic component and founder" in Syria and Iraq. They called for solidarity among all citizens to build peace, hope and unity.