Man gets deportation reprieve after drawing support from Cardinal Tobin and other clergy

Catalino Guerrero, who came to the U.S. illegally from Mexico in 1991, looks on during a news conference before attending an immigration hearing in Newark, N.J. Guerrero, a grandfather who lives in Union City, N.J., has been given a reprieve from potential deportation by customs officials in Newark, N.J., who approved a one-year stay of removal in April 2017. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)Catalino Guerrero, who came to the U.S. illegally from Mexico in 1991, looks on during a news conference before attending an immigration hearing in Newark, N.J. Guerrero, a grandfather who lives in Union City, N.J., has been given a reprieve from potential deportation by customs officials in Newark, N.J., who approved a one-year stay of removal in April 2017. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Guerrero came to the U.S. illegally from Mexico in 1991 and has worked and paid taxes, owns his house and has no criminal record. He has four children and four grandchildren. Guerrero applied for a work permit several years ago but filled out a form incorrectly, Menendez said last month.

He also has diabetes and suffered a stroke several years ago, his attorney said.

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A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman said last month that Guerrero was ordered removed from the U.S. in 2009 and must periodically report to ICE as a condition of his release.

Guerrero "puts a face" to what is often treated as "statistics or demons," Cardinal Tobin said.

Guerrero, who has four children and four grandchildren, "puts a face" to what is often treated as "statistics or demons," Tobin said before last month's hearing.

"You can see what Catalino looks like, and you've heard how he has lived," Tobin said. "We're now going to ask the officials determining his fate to not only see his face but ours as well."

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has issued a steady stream of criticisms of Trump's restrictions on refugees and immigrants. Other faith groups, including a network of 37 Protestant and Orthodox denominations that work with the aid group Church World Service, are mobilizing their congregations to fight Trump's policies.

Hundreds of houses of worship around the country have joined the sanctuary movement, which provides support or housing to people facing deportation.

 

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Thomas Severin
1 year 3 months ago

It is very important that the Church and other organizations that support immigrants continue to put a human face on those immigrants that ICE is deporting. Families like that of Mr. Guerrero stand in stark contrast to the image that Trump painted of refugees and immigrants during his campaign and the few months of his presidency.

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