The Pallium Lecture tackles challenges facing Catholic media

The challenges facing Catholic journalists covering the church and the secular world will be explored by America’s Matt Malone, S.J., and NBC’s Anne Thompson at  Thursday’s Pallium Lecture in Milwaukee. Father Malone President and Editor in Chief of America Media, will join Ms. Thompson, environmental affairs and Vatican correspondent for NBC Nightly News, for a conversation entitled, “Catholic Media: Reporters or Teachers—Prudently Countercultural or Indiscreetly Accommodating?” The two will also discuss the role of social media in modern reporting.

Deacon Michael Brown, a retired lawyer, will moderate the evening. The panel format is a change in presentation from previous lectures, which Former Archbishop Timothy Dolan began in 2003. Past Pallium Lecture participants include the Rev. Richard John Neuhaus, Helen Alvare and James Martin, S.J.

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The Archdiocese of Milwaukee is sponsoring the event, with funding from the The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation. To learn more about the free lecture, or to attend tonight’s event, click here

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William Rydberg
1 year 2 months ago
In my opinion should you want to be completely honest, the answer to the question for America Magazine is that you pick correspondents that report. Not much catechetical or for that matter apologetic going on from what is inthere. The wild card is one supposes is an appeal to maieutics.

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