Animal Ethics

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March 3, 2014 Podcast

Charles Camosy talks about his book For Love of Animals: Christian Ethics, Consistent Action, which examines the Christian's responsibility to "non-human animals" and the ethics of eating meat. Camosy talks what the Christian tradition says about the treatment of animals and the ways in which industrial practices place barriers between consumers and the food on our table. 

 

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J Cosgrove
3 years 7 months ago

I think the author might want to consider the concept that vegetarianism is immoral. Obviously, God did not think it a wise practice.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa5OBhXz-Q

Mark Stephen Caponigro
3 years 7 months ago

This is an extremely important issue, and we should be glad that this eloquent young Catholic. so well placed as a professor of theology at Fordham, is speaking out on behalf of animal protection.

With regard to the "seamless garment" and "pro-life": It is a great shame that so much Catholic good will in the US has been stifled by the narrow and misleading abuse of the plain term "pro-life" to mean one and only one kind of moral stance, on one and only one issue. In fact, it is to be hoped that we will come to recognize as true pro-life issues areas of concern in at least four categories, the first two belonging to human rights, the latter two moving beyond traditional biblicist anthropomorphism in the direction that Professor Camosy indicates:
1. Opposition to any easy resort to violence, including militarism, capital punishment, undue praise of members of the military and law enforcement, the "gun culture," the cult of the "good guy with a gun";
2. Opposition to gross inequities in standards of living, including the inadequate supply of food, water and shelter, and inadequate access to health care;
3. Commitment to environmental ethics, including taking action against the causes of climate change and of the biodiversity crisis;
4. Commitment to animal-protection ethics, including taking action in defense of the countless mammals, birds and fishes enslaved, exploited and made to suffer by the food industry.

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