Vatican welcomes Iran's historic nuclear deal

The Holy See welcomed Iran's historic nuclear deal and expressed hopes that more future breakthroughs be on the horizon on other issues.

Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, said that "the agreement on the Iranian nuclear program is viewed in a positive light by the Holy See."

Advertisement

"It constitutes an important outcome of the negotiations carried out so far, although continued efforts and commitment on the part of all involved will be necessary in order for it to bear fruit," he said in a written statement in response to reporters' questions on July 14.

"It is hoped that those fruits will not be limited to the field of nuclear program, but may indeed extend further," he said, without specifying what other areas of progress the Vatican hoped to see.

Hours after the deal was announced, the chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on International Justice and Peace also welcomed the agreement in a letter to members of the U.S. Congress.

Bishop Oscar Cantu of Las Cruces, New Mexico, encouraged the lawmakers to "support these efforts to build bridges that foster peace and greater understanding" and said it signaled progress in global nuclear weapons nonproliferation.

"We hope that the full implementation of the agreement will gradually foster an environment in which all parties build mutual confidence and trust so that progress will be made toward greater stability and dialogue in the region," the letter said. "In that spirit, our committee will continue to urge Congress to endorse the result of these intense negotiations because the alternative leads toward armed conflict, an outcome of profound concern to the church."

Under the new deal, decades-long sanctions by the United States, European Union and the United Nations eventually would be lifted in exchange for an agreement by Iran to restrict its nuclear program to peaceful purposes.

The negotiations involved Iran and what is often referred to as the "P5+1," or the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council—China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States—plus Germany.

The U.S. Congress and Iranian authorities would still need to review the agreement.

In January and in April, Pope Francis had expressed hopes that negotiations would end in an agreement. In his Easter message April 5, he said he hoped preliminary talks then underway would "be a definitive step toward a more secure and fraternal world."

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
HARRY CARROZZA DR/MRS
2 years 10 months ago
Incredible!! How can the US Administration who even with best of peaceful intentions accept a deal with Iran who is not only presently holding a group of our citizens captive but also is responsible for the killing & maiming of many of our Military with weapons exported by them.The only kind of fruit that this deal will yield is similar to the fruit offered by Satan to Adam & Eve. And we all know, i.e. those who still believe in the Bible & Catechism, where that event led to. MUNICH, MUNICH, MUNICH all over again when in September 1938 Neville Chamberlain made an agreement with Hitler and the fruit produced was rotten to the core & led to the barbaric deaths of MILLIONS of INNOCENT PEOPLE. One can never dialogue with Evil & if one takes the bait along with the temptation one must also assume the consequences. Harry D. Carrozza,MD USAF Veteran 1964-1966 President, Tucson Catholic Physicians Guid
David Pasinski
2 years 10 months ago
MUNICH MUNICH MUNICH... wondered how long it would take to make that classic and irrelevant reference....You may as well compare this with the Trojan Horse...

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce, Tuesday, May 22, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The Secretary of Education stirred up controversy when she said it was up to schools to decide if an undocumented student should be reported to authorities.
J.D. Long-GarcíaMay 25, 2018
Thousands gathered in Dublin May 12 to say "Love Both" and "Vote No" to abortion on demand. They were protesting abortion on demand in the forthcoming referendum May 25. (CNS photo/John McElroy)
“Priests and bishops get verbal abuse by being told, ‘How can you speak for women? You don’t know what it’s like!’”
America StaffMay 25, 2018
The coffin containing the body of St. John XXIII is seen during a ceremony in Vittorio Veneto Square after its arrival in Bergamo, Italy, May 24. The body of the late pope left the Vatican on May 24 to be displayed in his home region until June 10. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

BERGAMO, Italy (CNS) — Accompanied by Bishop Francesco Beschi of Bergamo and escorted by both Italian and Vatican police officers, the glass coffin containing the body of St. John XXIII left the Vatican early on May 24 for a 370-mile drive to Bergamo.

On this week's episode, we talk with Lieutenant Governor of Washington State, Cyrus Habib.
Olga SeguraMay 25, 2018