Teaching Moment

Several U.S. bishops wrote short reports giving a general sense of the responses to a survey for the Vatican in preparation for the upcoming synod on the family. Common among the comments was that Catholics admit to a poor understanding of the church’s teachings on the family. The Rev. Dennis Gill, director of the Philadelphia Archdiocese’s Office for Divine Worship and coordinator of the project, told CatholicPhilly.com, the archdiocesan news website, that the church has its educational work cut out for it. “One thing we did learn was that we have to be much more proactive,” he said. “We cannot just depend on church teaching filtering through the cracks.... Somehow the Gospel has to be presented in a way that is compelling, engaging, insisting on a response.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Paul Ferris
4 years 6 months ago
"Catholics admit to a poor understanding of the church's teaching on the family".....maybe they understand it too well and disagree..... "the church has it educational work cut out for it"...this could come out of the famous Animal Farm...."work harder" I thought the survey was to be more of a Listening Moment than a Teaching Moment......

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Brotherhood must not be used as a cloak for privilege and secrecy.
Matthew Wooters, S.J. September 24, 2018
Napoleon’s consolidation of power in France in 1801 involved the recognition of the pope as the “ordinary and immediate pastor” of the universal church—a key component in the impending agreement between the Vatican and China.
Jeffrey von ArxSeptember 24, 2018
"Young Latinos are engaged. They are open to giving of themselves,” Archbishop José Gomez said. “We need to be more conscious of ministries for young Catholics.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaSeptember 24, 2018
 A young woman holds the Latvian flag as Pope Francis celebrates Mass Sept. 24 at the Shrine of the Mother of God in Aglona, Latvia. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)
It was an important message for the 2.2 million people of Latvia, where today 37 percent of the population are Russian.
Gerard O’ConnellSeptember 24, 2018