Solidarity Urged for World Hunger Fight

“Since the end of the Second World War, the availability of food per person has increased by more than 40 percent,” Archbishop Silvano M. Tomasi, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, said, addressing the 25th Regular Session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva on March 10. Despite that progress, the archbishop said that hunger still afflicts more than 840 million people, but the problem “is much less evident since it persists mainly among those living in developing countries.” He said, “This type of hunger manifests itself as a ‘slow death’ caused by under-nutrition, depriving children of opportunities and the achievement of such developmental milestones as growth within normal standards, neuro-motory development and school performance, all of which are taken for granted by well-nourished people who live in high-income countries,” a situation he described, quoting Pope Francis, as a “real scandal.”‘

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Speaking in Chicago to a gathering of U.S. priests, Archbishop Wilton Gregory addressed racism, sexism and a host of other societal challenges that "continue to hold us captive."
Is the treatment being offered to Alfie Evans, a toddler suffering from a so-far-undiagnosed neurological disorder, moral, immoral or even medically inappropriate?
Kevin ClarkeApril 26, 2018
Young protesters call for an immigration bill to address the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at a rally in 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (CNS photo/Joshua Roberts, Reuters)
Archbishop Gomez called the USA Act a “good-faith compromise.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaApril 25, 2018
(iStock/itsmejust)
A new Pew Research Center poll finds that 87 percent of U.S. Catholics believe God is "all-loving," but only 67 percent say God is "all-powerful."