Pope Francis: Create Jobs, Not Weapons

The Catholic Church calls for the creation of job opportunities and the recognition of the dignity of the poor, not simply for more handouts or expanded government welfare programs, Pope Francis said in a video message played on Nov. 20 at the Italian church’s Festival of Catholic Social Teaching. As the global economic crisis continues, he said, there is a “great temptation to stop and lick one’s wounds, seeing them as an excuse not to hear the cry of the poor and see the suffering of those who have lost the dignity of bringing bread home because they have lost their jobs.” But Christians are called to look beyond their own needs and trust that by working with others, including with governments, they can “unleash goodness and enjoy its fruits.” The pope said, “Today it is said that many things cannot be done because there is no money,” yet “the money for weapons can be found, the money to make war, money for unscrupulous financial transactions.” At the same time, he said, there seems to be no money “to create jobs, to invest in learning, in people’s talents, to plan new welfare programs or to safeguard the environment.”

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Alexander Lim
3 years 4 months ago
So, the good Pope Francis is now advocating creating jobs. Whatever happened to his stern "demand" for "equality" by spreading wealth around? Whatever brought this turn-around attitude is indeed good news. Perchance, he's finally figured out that money will indeed eventually run out?

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