Pope Calls for Unity In Paraguay

Bishop Rogelio Livieres Plano of the Diocese of Ciudad del Este, Paraguay, who was dismissed from post, pictured after interview in Rome. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

After a Vatican investigation, Pope Francis removed a Paraguayan bishop from his post as head of the Diocese of Ciudad del Este because of “serious pastoral reasons.” But the bishop shot back later the same day, charging in an open letter that he was the victim of an ideological campaign by Paraguayan bishops in league with Vatican officials. Bishop Rogelio Livieres Plano, 69, was told to step down as head of the diocese, effective Sept. 25. Bishop Ricardo Valenzuela Rios of Villarrica del Espiritu Santo will temporarily administer the diocese. A Vatican statement said the “onerous decision” to dismiss Bishop Livieres was made after a “careful examination” of the findings of a Vatican investigation conducted by the congregations for bishops and for clergy. In the exercise of his ministry protecting unity among bishops and the faithful, according to the statement, Pope Francis “asks the clergy and all the people of God” in the diocese to accept the decision “with a spirit of obedience, docility and a neutral attitude.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
David Cruz-Uribe
3 years 10 months ago
An interesting action on the part of the Pope. I wonder who will be next. For a wrap up of reactions around the blogosphere, see my blog post: http://vox-nova.com/2014/10/03/there-is-a-new-sheriff-in-town/

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Bishop Lawrence T. Persico of Erie, Pa., speaks during a meeting in late January at the headquarters of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
“I think we need complete transparency if we’re going to get the trust of the people back,” said Erie Bishop Lawrence T. Persico.
Mélanie Thierry as Marguerite Duras in “Memoir of War.” © Music Box Films
The film tells the story of a woman who worked for the German-controlled Vichy government but secretly joined the Resistance movement.
A. W. Richard Sipe (photo: Facebook)
Sipe's research into celibacy and priestly sexual behavior helped guide the work of church leaders and others responding to the clergy sexual abuse crisis.
Catholic News ServiceAugust 17, 2018
Did Pope Francis depart from Scripture and tradition in declaring the death penalty "inadmissible"? Or was his declaration rooted deeply in both?
Tobias WinrightAugust 17, 2018