Oklahoma Bishop: Death Penalty ‘Brutal’

Archbishop Paul S. Coakley of Oklahoma City said the botched execution on April 29 of an Oklahoma inmate “highlights the brutality of the death penalty” and should bring the nation to “consider whether we should adopt a moratorium on the death penalty or even abolish it altogether.” The planned execution of Clayton Lockett, a convicted killer, in McAlester, Okla., using a new three-drug lethal injection protocol, failed, leaving Lockett showing signs of pain and causing prison officials to halt the procedure. Lockett later died of a heart attack. The state attorney general’s office agreed to a six-month stay of execution for Charles Warner, an inmate scheduled to be executed two hours after Lockett. Gov. Mary Fallin also ordered the state’s department of corrections to conduct a “full review of Oklahoma’s execution procedures to determine what happened and why” during the execution. Archbishop Coakley, in a statement on April 30, said, “How we treat criminals says a lot about us as a society.” The culture of death, he added, “threatens to completely erode our sense of the innate dignity of the human person.”

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Jonathan James
3 years 11 months ago
My sympathies for Mr Lockett are low. Perhaps the Bishop should include a description of Mr Lockett's crimes before he makes any comments about the "culture of death". Clayton Lockett, whose execution went wrong last night, was sentenced to death following the shocking murder of Stephanie Nieman, 19. She was kidnapped, shot twice and buried alive in 1999 a month after she graduated from high school. Lockett was involved in a botched raid on a house with two other men belonging to Bobby Bornt when Miss Neiman and another 19-year-old woman walked in. Reports from the time said that Mr Bornt owed Lockett money and that he was tied up and beaten during the ordeal.Miss Neiman's friend was dragged into the house and hit in the face with a shotgun. Under duress, the friend then called Miss Neiman into the home and she was also hit in the face with the gun. Her friend was raped by all three men before they were taken to a rural part of Kay County, Oklahoma Lockett told them that he was going to kill them all but shot Miss Neiman twice when she refused to give her keys and pickup's alarm code. When she was shot dead, she was stood in a shallow grave that had been dug by one of Lockett's accomplices, Shawn Mathis. He told Lockett that Miss Neiman was still alive, but Lockett ordered Mathis to bury her. http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/clayton-lockett-execution-shocking-crime-3478725#ixzz32BgTnR38 Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook
Jean-Pierre HERVEG
3 years 11 months ago

I was not choosen by the Lord to juge anybody ...

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Jonathan James
3 years 11 months ago

If the Pope is ever assigned jury duty, that is exactly what he will have to do.

This jury was assigned to judge and proclaim an appropriate sentence. To do otherwise would have been a failure of their duty.

When people cry about the death penalty, they seem to be ignoring what happened to the victims to get the accused a guilty verdict with a sentence of death.

Mike Evans
3 years 11 months ago
if enough jurors sitting on juries refuse to vote for the death penalty, it will soon be abandoned as impossible. Could anyone in good conscience be an executioner?
Beth Cioffoletti
3 years 11 months ago
It has been my experience that if you are in the jury pool for a capital crime and express a moral opposition to the use of the death penalty, you are automatically excluded from that pool.
Mike Evans
3 years 11 months ago
I cannot believe a sane person would even contemplate committing this awful crime. Yet we are somehow convinced that because it was an awful act, he must be killed in vengeance or reparation. Wouldn't it be far more humane and 'Christian' to treat the insanity and simply keep the man safely living out the rest of his days in confinement?

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